For several years, YEMA's ambition has been to offer a range of Manufacture In-house Calibers which involves the re-insourcing of the manufacturing process of most of the caliber components within our Morteau workshops. This significant development has required substantial investments in R&D and the expansion and modernization of our workshops and production lines.

Two years ago, we started partnering with Olivier Mory, a renowned French watchmaker, in an ambitious project aiming at improving our In-house Calibers and relocating the manufacturing of most components.

In parallel to these developments, a new common project made its way naturally: The design of a micro-rotor caliber whose components will be manufactured directly by our watchmakers in our Morteau workshops with the exception of the regulating organ, manufactured by our Swiss partners.

Baptised CALIBRE MANUFACTURE MORTEAU CMM.20, this new micro-rotor caliber project is the first stepping stone in YEMA's strategic plan to become a vertically integrated Manufacture and preserve our independent watchmaker status. 

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MANUFACTURE GRADE

ARCHITECTURE AND PERFORMANCE

YEMA's new CALIBRE MANUFACTURE MORTEAU CMM.20 In-house Caliber will benefit from refined components and a unique architecture envisioned by Olivier Mory:

Tungsten winding mass

The micro-rotor’s oscillating winding mass is made of a high density tungsten alloy in order to achieve the purpose of counterweight for this small volume but high weight micro-component, allowing optimized winding and a power reserve of +60 hours.

Glucydur Balance wheel

The balance wheel is made of Glucydur, a non-magnetic, low-thermal-expansion metal alloy which offers high resistant to deformation, corrosion, magnetic fields as well as low coefficient of thermal expansion, most suitable for precision elements that need a lot of dimensional stability.

Tungsten winding mass

The micro-rotor’s oscillating winding mass is made of a high density tungsten alloy in order to achieve the purpose of counterweight for this small volume but high weight micro-component, allowing optimized winding and a power reserve of +60 hours.

Glucydur Balance wheel

The balance wheel is made of Glucydur, a non-magnetic, low-thermal-expansion metal alloy which offers high resistant to deformation, corrosion, magnetic fields as well as low coefficient of thermal expansion, most suitable for precision elements that need a lot of dimensional stability.

French-Swiss Precision

This new French Manufacture In-house Caliber with Swiss regulating organ will offer high performance with a maximum rate of -5 / +10 seconds.

ULTRA-THIN CALIBER

Due to its smart architecture resulting in a contained thickness of just 3.70 mm (26% thinner than an ETA 2824), this new caliber will equip much thinner cases.

French-Swiss precision

This new French Manufacture In-house Caliber with Swiss regulating organ will offer high performance with a maximum rate of -5 / +10 seconds.

ULTRA-THIN CALIBER

Due to its smart architecture resulting in a contained thickness of just 3.70 mm (26% thinner than an ETA 2824), this new caliber will equip much thinner cases.

Micro-rotor

OLIVIER MORY

Watchmaker Partner

At the early age of 13, Olivier Mory began specialized watchmaking studies at the Lycée Edgar Faure in Morteau.

Patrick Augereau, who then worked as a part-time teacher at the Lycée in parallel with his main responsibility at Audemars Piguet, introduced Olivier to AP for his first professional experience as a Complications Watchmaker and Production Methods Technician.

Olivier then joined Sellita as Development Manager and finally the Richemont Group where he was responsible for prototyping and new products.

In 2016, he became an independent watchmaker and collaborates regularly with renowned Swiss and French watch brands.

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AT THE HEART OF WATCH CRAFTSMANSHIP

Known for its excellent craftsmanship, the French art of watchmaking has a longstanding tradition of excellence. It goes back more than six hundred years but it is in the 18th century that it takes off in Franche-Comté, the French region in the Jura mountains just a few miles away from Switzerland.

Watchmaking was first and foremost a meticulous craft practiced in winter as a supplementary activity by farmers living in the Jura mountains. Today the watchmaking craftsmanship is preserved by historical Franche-Comté brands like YEMA and the recurrent exchanges between skilled watch experts across the border.

YEMA's workshops are based in the small town of Morteau (Franche-Comté), surrounded by extensive pine forests in a secluded valley in the Jura mountains. YEMA is run by a third generation watchmakers‘ family of Morteau with a small scale team averaging +30 years of service. Today, YEMA and other local watchmakers are the worthy heirs of a long watchmaking tradition that goes back centuries.

All these historical and geographical elements have enabled the French Watchmaker YEMA to design its own In-house mechanical movement.

A DYNAMIC REGIONAL WATCHMAKING ECOSYSTEM

The French and Swiss watchmaking regions feed into each other in a synergetic way in terms of expertise and talent. 15,000 people from Morteau’s region work daily for neighbouring Swiss manufacturers while another 3,000 are employed by private label French watchmakers based between Morteau and Besançon.

YEMA actively participates in this regional watchmaking ecosystem by partnering with Lycée Edgar Faure in Morteau, which currently has more than 1,200 students. For more than 30 years, YEMA trains a dozen of apprentice watchmakers yearly through well-structured internships led by our Master Watchmaker, Jean-Paul Boillot.

French schools play an important role in the regional watchmaking ecosystem: Most alumni of Lycée Edgar Faure de Morteau work for Swiss manufactures, while 80% of Swiss watchmaking Managers are trained by the School of microtechnical engineers in Besançon (ENSMM).

Many French watchmakers decide to return to the French side of the valley after a few years in Switzerland, so as to join French watchmaking brands such as YEMA. This is the case of many of our watchmakers including Nicolas Bailly, our new Quality Assurance and Technical Manager who recently joined us after a previous working experience in Switzerland.

YEMA also works with Morteau’s town hall on projects aiming at further developing the watchmaking activity in the region, including a watchmaking start-ups incubator that is in the works.

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